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English Pages [] Year From the emergence of plainsong to the end of the fourteenth century, this Companion covers all the key aspects of medie. The impact of digital technologies on music has been overwhelming: since the commercialisation of these technologies in.

Featuring fascinating accounts from practitioners including performers and producers, this companion examines how develo. The term 'Jewish music' has conveyed complex and diverse meanings for people around the world across hundreds. This text provides an accessible and up-to-date introduction to the life and music of Edward Elgar.

Divided into three s. This Companion provides a guide to queer inquiry in literary and cultural studies. The essays represent new and emerging. This companion provides a comprehensive view of Beethoven and his work.

It covers topics such as: the composer as a priv. Electronic Music in Context: 1. The origins of electronic music Andrew Hugill 2. Electronic music and the studio Margaret Schedel 3. Live electronic music Nicolas Collins 4. Electronic Music in Practice: 5. Interactivity and live computer music Sergi Jorda 6. Algorithmic composition Karlheinz Essl 7.

Live audiovisuals Amy Alexander and Nick Collins 8. Network music Julian Rohrhuber 9. Electronic music and the moving image Julio d'Escrivan Lewis Part III. Analysis and Synthesis: Computer generation and manipulation of sounds Stefania Serafin The psychology of electronic music Petri Toiviainen Trends in electroacoustic composition Natasha Barrett Bibliography. The Cambridge Companion to Electronic Music Musicians are always quick to adopt and explore new technologies. The fast-paced changes wrought by electrification, from the microphone via the analogue synthesiser to the laptop computer, have led to a wide diversity of new musical styles and techniques.

A fascinating array of composers and inventors have contributed to a diverse set of technologies, practices and music. This book brings together some novel threads through this scene, from the viewpoint of researchers at the forefront of the sonic explorations empowered by electronic technology. The chapters provide accessible and insightful overviews of core topic areas and uncover some hitherto less publicised corners of worldwide movements. Recent areas of intense activity such as audiovisuals, live electronic music, interactivity and network music are actively promoted.

The Cambridge Companion to Electronic Music Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements, no reproduction of any part may take place without the written permission of Cambridge University Press. First published Third printing Printed in the United Kingdom at the University Press, Cambridge A catalogue record for this publication is available from the British Library ISBN hardback ISBN paperback Cambridge University Press has no responsibility for the persistence or accuracy of URLs for external or third-party internet websites referred to in this publication, and does not guarantee that any content on such websites is, or will remain, accurate or appropriate.

Information regarding prices, travel timetables and other factual information given in this work are correct at the time of first printing but Cambridge University Press does not guarantee the accuracy of such information thereafter. Auditory nerve; 2.

Cochlear nucleus; viii List of illustrations and figures 3. Superior olive; 4. Lateral lemniscus; 5. Inferior colliculus; 6. Thalamus; 7. Auditory cortex [] Head shadowing reduces the intensity of the sound arriving to the right ear [] A slow sequence of tones with alternating frequencies left is perceived as a single stream; the same sequence played twice as fast is perceived as two separate streams; b Grouping by common fate. Two frequency slides are perceived as separate tones left ; when a tone burst is played between the slides, they are perceived as a single tone [] Her artwork spans the fields of digital media art and audiovisual performance and has been presented on the Internet, in clubs and on the street, as well as in festivals and museums.

She is also a co-founder of the Runme. Natasha Barrett UK works as a freelance composer and performer of acousmatic and live electroacoustic music. Her compositional output consists of works for instruments and live electronics, sound installations, dance, theatre, and animation projects, but all energy stems from her acousmatic approach to sound and its spatio-musical potential. In she received the Nordic Council Music Prize. Since completing her doctoral composition studies in London she has lived in Oslo, Norway.

His interests run the gamut of topics in electronic music, but particular specialisms include algorithmic composition, live electronica, machine listening and interactive music systems. He occasionally tours the world as the non-Swedish half of the Swedish audiovisual laptop duo klipp av. Nicolas Collins studied composition with Alvin Lucier, worked for many years with David Tudor, and has collaborated with soloists and ensembles around the world.

Recent recordings are available on PlateLunch, Periplum and Apestaartje. His electroacoustic music has been recorded, broadcast and performed in Europe and the Americas. He has worked extensively in music for TV advertising, documentaries and film with x Notes on contributors some incursions into new media. He is a senior lecturer in music at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge.

Karlheinz Essl was born in in Vienna. He studied composition with Friedrich Cerha and musicology at the University of Vienna doctorate , with a thesis on Anton Webern. Besides writing experimental instrumental music, he performs on his own computer-based electronic instrument, develops algorithmic composition software and creates generative sound and video environments. In he will become professor of composition at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna.

Between and , he studied composition with Roger Marsh at the University of Keele. Symphony for Cornwall used the internet in a ground-breaking way. During the s, he worked extensively in performances and installations in collaboration with other artists La Fura dels Baus, Marcel.

He holds a Ph. He has written many articles and two books, and has given workshops, lectured and performed though Europe, Asia and America. Julian Rohrhuber is a German artist and theorist, working in the fields of cultural theory, philosophy and media art. His art projects include installations and performances, film sound tracks, a system for interactive sound programming, and various collaborative and network art pieces.

He currently works in a research project at the University of Cologne, and at the Academy of Media Arts Cologne, where he teaches algorithmic acoustics and works on art theory, programming and philosophy. Margaret Anne Schedel is a composer and cellist specialising in the creation and performance of ferociously interactive media.

She is working towards a certificate in Deep Listening and serves as the xi Notes on contributors musical director for Kinesthetech Sense. Usually found in the San Francisco bay area, she runs workshops for Making Things. Stefania Serafin is currently associate professor in sound modelling at Aalborg University in Copenhagen.

She holds a Ph. He has published numerous articles on computational modelling of music perception and cognition. Currently his research focuses on computational music analysis, music and movement, and modelling of musical emotions. Ge Wang received his B. Ge also composes and performs via various electroacoustic and computer-mediated means. Without the chapter authors and the artists who have kindly provided statements, there would hardly be any book to have the honour of editing!

Additional proofreading and comments were provided by a number of the chapter authors. Meg Schedel owes a debt of gratitude to her proofreading parents, Rita and Charles Schedel. Julian Rohrhuber appreciates the immensely useful advice from, and acknowledges the inspirations of, his colleagues. Ge Wang wishes to extend hearty thanks to Perry Cook for his teaching and insights on the history of programming and music, to Ananya Misra for providing invaluable feedback from beginning to end, to Mark Ballora for his excellent online history of computer music, to Max Mathews for information and perspective, and to Rebecca Fiebrink, Spencer Salazar and Matt Hoffman for their support.

Nick Collins thanks everyone who suffered any editorial attention from him, and acknowledges with great respect and warmth his collaborators and colleagues in the field. He particularly welcomes the support and essential input of his co-editor. He also wishes to extend a special thank you to the third person.

Also a special thanks to his co-editor, for roping him into this wonderful project and for his invaluable constructive criticism. The Tel-musici Company combine a telephone exchange with a music room; they are bankrupt within a few years, just like Cahill Luigi Russolo writes his manifesto The Art of Noises Lev Termen invents the Theremin Ottorino Respighi combines a phonograph playing alongside an orchestra in Pini di Roma. Fruitful crossovers with other media and arts have allowed it to reach new audiences and to become an accomplice in many forms of expression.

It appears ubiquitous, from mobile phones, television and podcasts to the art gallery and other unorthodox performance spaces. In many ways, electronic music is now so well accepted and integrated into contemporary practice that it is transparent to the observer.

Yet on the periphery of musical exploration it remains highly visible — from sonic art, to live electronics, to new advances in computational music. Whilst electronic music would not restrict itself to computer-mediated art, much current work in this area is related to computational applications and the boom in accessibility of home computers.

The last sixty years have seen a move from rare electronic music studios to the ubiquity of bedroom studios. As if the thought experiment about Shakespearian monkeys has come true, millions of composers are at large exploring a multiplicity of software and devices in the pursuit of their own musical worlds. The entry cost of an electronic music hobby is no longer the hard graft of acoustic instrument practice, but a simple willingness to explore musical outputs within predominantly visual software paradigms.

The influence of computers in compositional techniques, sound analysis and processing, performance interfaces and concert practice is astounding. Yet the mass of software and hardware recording and performing tools are resting on a wonderful heritage. The essential musical tools of the twentieth century have often been proclaimed to be microphones and loudspeakers. A rich history underlies electronic music, full of radical inventors, pioneering composers and daring innovators.

Modern-day musicians indiscriminately employing the technology might only know Karlheinz Stockhausen as a face on the cover of Sgt. However, the worldwide success of electronic dance music and other electronica has raised the profile of the pioneers of electronic music and increased our curiosity about the foundations of this subject area.

And as new experimental music inevitably proves itself in time or dissolves from view the cutting-edge research of today will inform new musical movements of the future. Given such a vibrant tableau, this book can only attempt to survey and analyse a proportion of the developments and innovations. We have gathered here what we hope is an exciting collection of perspectives on electronic music. We have tried to encourage novel approaches to the more welltrodden topics, taking in the distant history and origins of electronic music, the relation of computers to music, and highlighting fascinating figures such as Halim el-Dabh, Laurie Spiegel and Gottfried Michael Koenig.

We have also commissioned chapters on some less widely represented themes from the research front. Topics vary from virtual and artificial musicians, through audiovisual and crossmedia practice, to aspects of interactivity, music psychology and network music. Whilst there may be some overlap with familiar notions and history of electronic music, we have tried to avoid duplicating the content that can be found in already well-known books a representative sample of which are included at the end of this introduction.

Indeed, in this manically communicating world the target is moving quickly. For instance, the proliferation of dialects and idioms is nowhere more publicised than in electronic dance music, where new genres are promoted each week in a desperate bid to put space between producers and their rivals for economic advantage. This rapidity of advance may eventually make writing any book impinging on contemporary topics an exponentially difficult task.

Rapidity is also fun however; there is no need to be bored or uninspired, look at all the activity! Far more recordings are released each year than you could ever listen to in multiple lifetimes. To guide us in our coverage of the subject, the contributors to this book range widely, across a number of generations of academics, writers and composers, from many locations in the world.

An international flavour befits the current age of mass participation and mass communication, and we hope to see a truly global accessibility and a globally intensive exploration of electronic music in the future.

Whilst it remains true that many accounts and explorations of electronic music have involved European and American artists, the wider world has not been idle, even if the media coverage and technological apparatus have not always been of the same order. We have also deliberately engaged with media beyond sound alone. Though the acousmatic is covered on its own terms, we have also reserved two chapters for audiovisual art.

This is not just because such practice is an exciting area of contemporary activity, but because its history is interleaved with that of electronic music; indeed, early experiments with optical soundtracks predate magnetic tape. We have also pursued an active approach to live electronic music, as opposed to fixed recordings; the latter medium remains an area where traditional Western classical music might however misguidedly claim superiority over electronic experimentation.

We wish to show how much interesting work has been undertaken to confront the possibilities of electronic music for concert use, and honestly appraise the issues involved in the union of machines and musicians. It seems pertinent at this point to confront one division in contemporary musical life which is the subject of much discussion and stress to some : the polarity of electroacoustic caricatured as serious academic art music and electronica as popular electronic music,5 but also including many forms of experimental electronic music.

In reality, various continua stretch between these forms. Perhaps there is a certain amount of posturing going on for economic and artistic reasons; this can lead to a certain sociological resistance to new states of play in musical affairs. Electronic music is joyfully accessible to anyone with a computer of even limited power — an instrument today as intuitive to some as the electric guitar was to previous generations.

For others, it can be threatening that those lacking formal training still produce fascinating electronic music; yet many successful practitioners learn as they go. What does this mean in practical terms? These divisions are not meant to be overly prescriptive, for chapter authors discussing practices or foundational themes will also delve into the history, and vice versa.

Whilst we hope that these chapters will be accessible to a reader previously unfamiliar with electronic music, the authors have not shied from making original assertions and bringing in subjects of controversy and contemporary research. Part of the charm of this area is that it is very much alive and continually transforming, and the most fascinating works may be yet to come; indeed, from readers of this book! Further reading Chadabe, J. New York: Continuum Dodge, C. New York: Routledge Manning, P.

London: Bloomsbury Roads, C. New York: Caipirinha Productions Inc. We have harmony which you have not, of quarter-sounds and lesser slides of sounds. Divers instruments of music likewise to you unknown, some sweeter than any you have; with bells and rings that are dainty and sweet. We represent small sounds as great and deep, likewise great sounds extenuate and sharp; we make divers tremblings and warblings of sounds, which in their original are entire.

We represent and imitate all articulate sounds and letters, and the voices and notes of beasts and birds. We have certain helps which, set to the ear, do further the hearing greatly; we have also divers strange and artificial echoes, reflecting the voice many times, and, as it were, tossing it; and some that give back the voice louder than it came, some shriller and some deeper; yea, some rendering the voice, differing in the letters or articulate sound from that they receive.

We have all means to convey sounds in trunks and pipes, in strange lines and distances. Francis Bacon, The New Atlantis 1 The origins of electronic music lie in the creative imagination. The technologies that are used to make electronic music are a realisation of the human urge to originate, record and manipulate sound. Although the term electronic music refers specifically to music made using electronic devices and, by extension, to certain mechanical devices powered by electricity, the musical possibilities that these technologies have opened up are a recurring theme in literature, art, engineering and philosophy.

But it was not until the turn of the twentieth century, when electronic and electromechanical instruments started to become a physical reality, that certain forwardlooking musicians began to turn to the new possibilities already imagined by others. The New Atlantis, written in and published in , was a utopian tale of mariners in the southeastern seas who were shipwrecked upon an island containing a model civilisation, in which science and spirituality found union.

De Caus created steam engines, fountains and many water-driven musical instruments including a playerpiano, mechanical songbirds and various organs. It seems to express a desire to expand musical language beyond the familiar pitch-based system of Western instrumental music, to incorporate sound processing, novel timbres, microtonal tunings, amplification, recording, spatialisation — in short, every technique known to electronic music.

The majority of his work and thought arose from a rejection of the received wisdom of the period, founded upon Plato and Aristotle, and an enthusiastic reappraisal of the pre-Socratic philosophers, such as Epicurus — BC , Democritus — BC and Thales c.

These philosophers developed a theory of matter. Thales argued for an underlying unity based on the idea that the world was made from water. Democritus developed this idea to suggest that all matter is made from imperishable indivisible elements called atoms, which are surrounded by a void, and have various characteristics size, shape, mass, etc whose complex interactions give rise to physical reality.

Epicurus in turn refined Democritus by theorising that the atoms are in continuous state of parallel motion from an absolute high to an absolute low. Every so often, one atom inexplicably makes a slight swerve the clinamen in its path, creating a chain reaction of collisions, which give rise to matter. Thales, for example, wrote that amber rubbed with animal fur could lift straw and feathers, and Democritus observed fire to conclude that motion is inherent to atomic particles.

Music theory in the sixteenth century was in the grip of a debate about tuning systems. Writers such as Nicola Vicentino —c. The adoption of these latter systems enabled both musical instruments and, ultimately, published music notation, to be disseminated across Europe. This solution is still the dominant western musical tuning system today. It is only as electronic technologies have become available that the music envisaged by Bacon and perhaps Pythagoras too has become a reality.

However, the absence of these technologies in the intervening years did not eliminate the urge to create this kind of music. The most celebrated engineer was Jacques Vaucanson —82 , whose machines took on a life of their own by mimicking natural and biological functions.

His life-size flute-player blew, breathed and played twelve different melodies so convincingly like a human being that it surpassed previous mechanical devices. This automaton, or self-operating machine, started to resemble a robot in its simulation of human action. Vaucanson had numerous imitators, and the general spirit of mechanical and scientific experiment at that time was contagious. The fascination with automata was also pursued in contemporary philosophy, most notably in the writings of Julien de La Mettrie — In doing so, he set himself against the prevailing Cartesian idea that mind and body are separate and occasioned the wrath of many of his contemporaries.

Not that this bothered him: he cheerfully asserted the idea that we only have one life and it is our duty to enjoy ourselves as much as possible while we are alive. He duly lived fast and died young. As the interest in automata grew, so did the concept of an artificial intelligence although that phrase was not itself used at the time. The most celebrated example of this was a hoax, but the fact that people were fooled gave rise to a large amount of imaginative fiction that predicted, amongst other things, electronic music.

Once again, the creative imagination in this case the literary imagination anticipated developments which musicians themselves ignored. It was created in by Baron Wolfgang von Kempelen, and its most famous exploit was to beat Napoleon Bonaparte at chess. The literary imagination The first major writer to be inspired by such automata to apply their capabilities to music was E.

Hoffmann — Now, in the case of instruments of the keyboard class a great deal might be done. There is a wide field open in that direction to clever mechanical people, much as has been accomplished already; particularly in instruments of the pianoforte genus. All the attempts to evoke music from metal or glass cylinders, glass threads, slips of glass, or pieces of marble; or to cause strings to vibrate or sound in ways unlike the ordinary ways, are to me interesting in the highest degree.

As he says: Composers work with substances of which they know nothing. Why should a brass and a wooden instrument — a bassoon and horn — have so little identity of tone, when they act on the same matter, the constituent gases of the air? Their differences proceed from some displacement of those constituents, from the way they act on the elements which are their affinity and which they return, modified by some occult and unknown process.

If we knew what the process was, science and art would both be gainers. Whatever extends science enhances art. The music he creates is judged to be too far ahead of its time, too incomprehensible, by his audience. Supposing for instance, that the fundamental relations of pitched sounds in the science of harmony and of musical composition were susceptible of such expression and adaptations, the engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent.

She may nevertheless be regarded as the first computer programmer. Her writings, although scientifically and technically grounded, display the same tendency to Romantic vision as those of her own father, the poet Lord Byron. The combination of science with fiction is a theme in the work of E. Hoffmann, Balzac and Mary Shelley, who created perhaps the most sophisticated fantasy of an artificial life in Frankenstein The monster, it will be recalled, is awakened by electricity by using a lightning-rod.

This was undoubtedly inspired by the discoveries of Benjamin Franklin, himself a musical inventor,6 who first flew a kite designed to conduct 13 The origins of electronic music electricity in Some mystical and visionary writings of the nineteenth century also contain descriptions of musical possibilities enabled by new technologies that prefigure electronic music. A typical example occurs in the novel A Crystal Age by W. The hero, Julian West, awakens in Boston in the year , after more than a century of sleep, to find the world changed beyond recognition and with most of the social problems of his time resolved.

In describing the world of the future he outlines numerous imaginary technologies, including the following description of a music system. It is not made by faeries or genii, but by good, honest, and exceedingly clever human hands. We have simply carried the idea of labor-saving by cooperation into our musical service as into everything else. There are a number of music rooms in the city, perfectly adapted acoustically to the different sorts of music. These halls are connected by telephone with all the houses of the city whose people may care to pay the small fee, and there are none, you may be sure, who do not.

There are on that card for today, as you will see if you observe closely, distinct programs of four of these concerts, each of a different order of music from the others, being now simultaneously performed, and any one of the four pieces now going on that you prefer, you can hear by merely pressing the button which will connect your house wire with the hall where it is being rendered.

The programs are so coordinated that the pieces at any one time simultaneously proceeding in the different halls usually offer a choice, not only between instrumental and vocal, and between different sorts of instruments, but also between different motives from grave to gay, so that all tastes and moods can be suited.

This idea of a telegraph-based music distribution system led to the construction of the first really influential electronic musical instrument. To an ever greater degree the work of art reproduced becomes the work of art designed for reproducibility. The beginnings of this fundamental change in the way music is experienced and consumed lie in the later part of the nineteenth century, although some purely mechanical recording devices, such as the musical box and the player-piano, existed earlier.

One such device worth noting was the phonautograph, invented in by Leon Scott. This recorded a sound through a vibrating membrane attached to a pen which drew a line resembling the waveform. This could only record, however, and could not reproduce the original sound. The earliest microphones were, strictly speaking, the telephone transmitter devices invented by Elisha Gray and Alexander Graham Bell, but Emile Berliner is usually credited with the invention of the first true microphone in However, when Thomas Edison invented the carbon microphone later in the same year, his was the first to become commercially available.

Edison also invented the phonograph in , although a Frenchman, Charles Cros, came up with the same idea independently and slightly earlier. The phonograph used a similar principle to the phonautograph, except that the pen drew grooves into a relatively soft material wax, tin foil or lead.

These grooves could then be retraced by a needle and amplified mechanically. It was not long before this system was mass produced. In , Emile Berliner patented a phonographic system using flat discs rather than cylinders, called the gramophone. These, combined with both the electromechanical and magnetic systems described above, evolved rapidly. By the early s, electrical recordings would become a viable medium thanks to the invention of magnetic tape recording in by Fritz Fleumer in Germany.

The impact of recorded and reproducible sound on music in general was, of course, enormous. However, it was some time before composers and musicians began to realise the creative potential of this new medium. The systematic exploration of tape music had to wait until the early s, when Pierre Schaeffer began his experiments.

A good example, and probably the first truly electronic instrument, was the Singing Arc, invented by William Duddell in , which used the sounds emitted by carbon arc lamps the precursors of the electric light bulb. It was some time before electronic instruments would come to be included alongside their acoustic counterparts but, even so, Western music was already beginning to evolve to a point at which such new means of expression would be required.

Composers were exploring musical material in a variety of different ways, and some of these started to focus upon the sonic and timbral properties that the pitch-centred notation system had marginalised. However, this was not a direction that Schoenberg pursued in his subsequent work, preferring to continue to overturn the orthodoxies of the tonal system instead. Keyboard instruments, in particular, have so thoroughly schooled our ears that we are no longer capable of hearing anything else — incapable of hearing except through this impure medium.

Yet Nature created an infinite gradation — infinite! Who still knows it nowadays? While busied with this essay I received from America direct and authentic intelligence which solves the problem in a simple manner. I refer to an invention by Dr. Thaddeus Cahill. He has constructed an apparatus that makes it possible to transform an electric current into a fixed and mathematically exact number of vibrations. We would be discovering sound-forms independently of musical conventions.

Kandinsky was inspired by Theosophy and other spiritual ideas to create work that aspired to the condition of music. This was a staged version of a novel by Raymond Roussel, in which various bizarre machines and musical instruments were powered by amongst other things : a thermo-sensitive chemical called Bexium; drops of heavy water let fall by a large worm; extended vocal techniques; resonating pulmonary braid; and lightning.

According to Hugo Ball, the Dada cabaret included African music, a balalaika orchestra, and Dada music by composers such as Erwin Schulhoff. I recited the following: gadji beri bimba glandridi lauli lonni cadori. The Art of Noises is an important text in the history of electronic music, because it is the first attempt seriously to categorise all sounds and, indeed, to treat them as potential music.

In a crucial passage, Russolo wrote: Every manifestation of our life is accompanied by noise. The noise, therefore, is familiar to our ear, and has the power to conjure up life itself. Sound, alien to our life, always musical and a thing unto itself, an occasional but unnecessary element, has become to our ears what an overfamiliar face is to our eyes. Noise, however, reaching us in a confused and irregular way from the irregular confusion of our life, never entirely reveals itself to us, and keeps innumerable surprises in reserve.

We are therefore certain that by 18 Andrew Hugill selecting, coordinating and dominating all noises we will enrich men with a new and unexpected sensual pleasure. Although it is characteristic of noise to recall us brutally to real life, the art of noise must not limit itself to imitative reproduction. Here are the 6 families of noises of the Futurist orchestra which we will soon set in motion mechanically: 1. Rumbles: 2. Whistles: 3. Whispers: 4. Voices of animals and men: Shouts Screams Groans Shrieks Howls Laughs Wheezes Sobs In this inventory we have encapsulated the most characteristic of the fundamental noises; the others are merely the associations and combinations of these.

The intonarumori included percussion, but also a range of machinelike instruments deriving from the categories above. Russolo even devised a graphic notation for scoring his noise music, and achieved notoriety in after performances in Milan and London. After the war the intonarumori were recorded in combination with classical orchestras, but none of the original instruments survives today.

The spirit of Dada and Futurism permeated through to mainstream concert music. Electronic music The inclusion of electronic sounds in conventional music does not in itself amount to the origins of an electronic music, as distinct from any other kind 19 The origins of electronic music Figure 1. Electronic music is a synthesis of many different aspects of what has already been described: the array of loudspeakers, or acousmatic situation; the creation of new electronic instruments; the exploration of novel tunings and timbres; the use of recording and reproduction technologies; the relationship between science, mathematics and music.

Certain compositional techniques which are features of electronic music have their roots in much earlier music. To take one example, algorithmic composition, which uses a strict set of rules to compose music, can be traced back through voiceleading counterpoint to the metrical procedures of certain types of late medieval music.

Electronic music has, thanks largely to digital technologies, been able to make algorithms that are more complex and more diverse, by including chance and extreme determinism, artificial intelligence and generative processes.

When we ignore it, it disturbs us. When we listen to it, we find it fascinating. The sound of a truck at 50 m. Static between the stations. We want to capture and control these sounds, to use them, not as sound effects, but as musical 20 Andrew Hugill instruments. Given four film phonographs, we can compose and perform a quartet for explosive motor, wind, heartbeat, and landslide. In the early s the Australian, Grainger, had begun to dream of new technologies for music.

It was nevertheless many years before Grainger was able to build his own machines to perform the Free Music. A typical example is the Kangaroo Pouch Machine of , which is essentially the controller of a collection of solovoxes or theremins. These control eight oscillators, connected by electrical wires, which play the Free Music.

By the time Grainger was able to build his machines, there were probably technologies in existence which would have made the realisation of Free 21 The origins of electronic music Figure 1. The recordings that exist of these fleeting sonic experiments are rough, but repeated listening reveals a clear musical concept at work.

Today when science is equipped to help the composer realize what was never before possible. But after all what is music but organized noises? And a composer, like all artists, is an organizer of disparate elements. The electronic medium is adding an unbelievable variety of new timbres to our musical store, but most important of all, it has freed music from the tempered system, which has prevented music from keeping pace with the other arts and with science.

Composers are now able, as never before, to satisfy the dictates of that inner ear of the imagination. They are also lucky so far in not being hampered by aesthetic codification — at least not yet! But I am afraid it will not be long before some musical mortician begins embalming electronic music in rules.

He composed only a handful of works, and he experienced rejection both by the general public and his professional colleagues including Schoenberg. His attempts to convince Bell Laboratories to allow him to research electronic music during the s and s failed. This was essentially a sound installation, which used four hundred loudspeakers to create a walk-through sonic experience that combined synthesised and recorded and processed sounds. This classic work remains highly influential today: a high point in the early development of electronic music.

One can find kotatsu, low tables, covered by blankets with a heater underneath, in almost every Japanese household. It should come as no surprise that the face of electronic music has changed dramatically since the s, but the field has changed spectacularly even within the past ten years.

My laptop is more powerful today than the fastest computers I had access to ten years ago, and I can store more data on a portable drive no bigger than my finger than I ever could on the hard drives in the studios where I worked fifteen years ago.

Technology is no longer a limiting factor for most musicians, but what does this mean for the field as a whole? Given the portability of recording and production technology, how will electronic music reflect local and even transient cultures? Does the ease of production imply a healthy democratisation of the aesthetic of electronic music or perhaps its corruption? How does the liquidation of the studio change the process of composition and production?

How does kotatsutop music differ aesthetically, sociologically and conceptually from the music created at major electronic music centres? To answer these questions I interviewed electroacoustic musicians of many different ages, nationalities and experiences. Some names, such as Max Mathews and Pauline Oliveros will be familiar to readers who have even a passing acquaintance with the field of electronic music; others, such as Takuro Mizuta Lippit aka DJ Sniff and Mara Helmuth will be familiar to only a few.

This chapter is an attempt to provide an inclusive overview of electronic music studios from around the world. Pierre Schaeffer Pierre Schaeffer is generally acknowledged as the first composer to create music with pre-recorded media: his sound collage Etude aux Chemins de Fer has a prominent place in most histories of electronic and computer music. These same histories tend to concentrate on the studios of Europe and North America, and indeed most electronic music studios are concentrated in these two continents.

Yet this is most likely due to reporting bias, for the most dominant nations tend to control history. While researching this chapter I was determined to overcome this prejudice, and interview people from all areas of the world. I was pleased to discover that important work has been happening in every corner of the globe for many decades. During the year in which I was writing this chapter, more attention has been brought to the diverse history of electronic music.

Composers of electronic music in many parts of the world have operated in relative obscurity for years. Often, performance opportunities in countries outside Europe and North America have been limited and resources tight. Wider international knowledge of their work has at times been limited to those with whom they studied, such as in Utrecht and New York City. His experiments, in , electronically processing recordings made with a wire recorder, a medium that predated tape, may be counted among the first works for pre-recorded media: [I] emphasised the harmonics of the sound by removing the fundamental tones and changing the reverberation and echo by recording in a space with movable walls.

It was not easy to do. In the second half of the twentieth century much of the electronic music research and composition was done in highly specialised research studios similar to the RTF; in the twenty-first century most composers have high quality artistic studios at their homes with no corporate interest dictating research directions.

Technology and aesthetics Technology precedes artistic invention. John Adams The history of electronic music is tied inexorably to advances in technology. The character of electronic music changes much more quickly than traditional Western classical music because the rapid pace of technological advances influences the aesthetics of any given decade.

We have gone through an incredible number of phases, riding on the technology which has become much more powerful with each passing year. Aesthetic differences in compositional techniques also dictate a philosophy to studio users. In addition to creating a wholly new aesthetic, technology can also augment or influence a practice which is already in place; Kwaito, most often defined as South African hip-hop, uses sequencers, drum machines and samplers to create a distinct style of music which is still based on a symmetrical timeline pattern — additive structures with a base of fast elementary 27 Electronic music and the studio pulse units.

Kwaito producers use a computer to create complex rhythmic structures which reference the past. Alas, they are often programmed in very blunt ways, both rhythmically and sonically, whereas most rhythms played by African musicians contain a great amount of subtlety and irregularity, arising from idiosyncrasies in phrasing that might vary from place to place, or due to personal style, historical precedence, or even deliberate imprecision in its execution Ligeti If the tools musicians use influence the music they make, what happens when an attempt at standardisation occurs?

It should come as no surprise that the music coming out of Japan was much more similar to German music, than the geographically closer Korean electronic music. Korea historically never had a major studio, but Sung Ho Hwang believes that this limitation helped Koreans develop as idiomatic composers. Today almost every studio has a unique combination of equipment, which should lead to different sounds, but to my ear it seems there is more similarity in the music from different studios today than there was in the past.

Perhaps this is a consequence of the information age — ideas are transmitted instantaneously across the Internet, and software is much easier to duplicate than hardware. Thus composers from different parts of the world have many of the same tools at their disposal.

Another result of the propagation of home studios is that fewer composers are travelling to use professional studios. Barry Truax misses the days when composers would come to Simon Fraser University to use his facilities; he hopes the custom-built AudioBox, a computer-controlled system for diffusion, will be an incentive for composers to visit again. Pieces mastered at Simon Fraser using the AudioBox have a unique sound, although it is not timbral; rather the distinction comes from the swiftly moving surround sound experience.

It remains to be seen if studios will be able to retain a cohesive aesthetic within this renewed pioneering spirit of do-it-yourself electronics. Accessibility: cost, size and speed The dynamaphone [Telharmonium] weighed two hundred tons, was over sixty feet in length and cost two hundred thousand dollars. Peter Manning The barriers to electronic music have dropped significantly in the past twenty years; cost, size and speed are the three main factors in this revolution.

It is obvious from these numbers that the exponential growth of microprocessors has changed the landscape of electronic music radically Manning , p. The total number of people working in the field is staggering when compared to the s, when maybe a few hundred people were involved; there are now millions alone with access to the music editing software that comes pre-installed on Apple computers. While producing highly virtuosic music, early electronic music composers were nevertheless constrained to construct their pieces via painstaking tape-manipulation techniques; cutting and splicing tiny sections of recorded electronic material.

Expensive and enormous electronic equipment was confined to well-funded research centers and radio stations. A technologically adept generation raised on home computer and video games begins to explore the equipment at its disposal. Cox and Warner , p.

Musicians using analogue equipment had to spend untold hours physically grappling with tape and razor blades. Those using the earliest digital tools suffered from delays ranging from overnight to several days between creating a program and hearing the resultant music. A trip across the city was sometimes necessary to complete a work because the digital to analogue converters were only found in a few locations, while computers were more plentiful Manning , p.

Now laptops are so fast that there is virtually no delay between composing and hearing the result, so powerful that most musicians do not use their full capacity, and priced so low that it is not uncommon for musicians, even in developing countries, to own several machines. Sound technologies are more than just tools for the creation of music; they are social artefacts.

For years, electronic musicians have been influenced by the competing agendas of audio research, commercial profit, government programs and artistic expression. For poorer countries, such as Mexico, where there has never been a governmental investment in electronic music, falling equipment prices have meant that the government can now help to fund studios. The new Center for Music and Sonic Art in Morelia, Mexico is funded half by the federal government and half by the local government,14 hopefully creating a lasting socio-political musical entity.

Before he started working at STEIM, Takuro Mizuta Lippit had never even spent time in a professional studio; he learned everything from the internet, and he freely admits that about eighty per cent of the code he uses is written by someone else. The internet is more than a repository for code; it has allowed for many other possibilities including the download of audio, the study of history, and the creation virtual communities.

It is not academically based, and for the most part the composers involved are self-taught Cascone , p. Does this accessibility have its own cost? The invention may be staggering, but the world of experts has been replaced by the world of technology, creating a desultory effect on much music. Most of the musicians I interviewed believe that this ease of construction has led to a decided increase in the percentage of poor pieces with electronics, but because the number of people writing for electronics has increased, the actual number of good pieces has increased.

Now you have ten thousand people working in the field, and out of those works between fifty and one hundred pieces are interesting. Pauline Oliveros was the only person interviewed to miss equipment — specifically the warmth and ruggedness of tube amplifiers — but she also regrets that there are now more conformity enforcers than innovators. I enjoyed the field before there were definitions. Yet as the technical capabilities have expanded, the range of musical possibilities which are being explored has become increasingly restricted.

A revolution is brewing, a revolution based not on technical innovations but on aesthetic growth. And Center provides volume compensation for signals panned into the middle of the surround field [that usually sound louder]. Finally, a multi-dimensional crossfader enables experimental routing and advanced sound design. Share this: Ableton on Facebook Ableton on Twitter. Grain Scanner lets you design experimental noises, glitchy effects, alien textures and massive clouds of ambience.

Its advanced sound engine turns any sample into a blank slate for otherworldly synth parts. Entangled Species is a collection of over cinematic sounds designed for Ableton's Tension. It is perfect for creating electro-acoustic and ambient arrangements.

Outer Spaces is a versatile new audio processor that puts your sounds in beautiful spaces — but it goes way beyond your standard reverb. A comprehensive toolkit of otherworldly strikes, atmospheres and textures for game, film and television scoring, and experimental music production. Max for Live Surround Panner by Ableton Surround Panner is a free Max for Live device that makes mixing for performances, installations and theaters using multi-channel speaker setups possible in Live.

Included in Live 11 Suite. Features: XY controlled, multi-speaker panning device with smoothing functionality. Rotation control for circular movement in a two-dimensional space.

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Dune 2. Logic Pro Templates. Editor's Pick. Ableton Live Tutorials. Liquid Notes Tutorials. Reaktor Tutorials. Ableton Push. Dune Tutorials. Reason Absynth Tutorials. Logic Pro X Tutorials. Access Virus Tutorials. Maschine Jam. Rounds Tutorials.

Fab Filter Pro R. Maschine Tutorials. First Look. Massive Tutorials. Serum Tutorials. FL Studio Tutorials. Massive X Tutorials. Arrangement Tutorials. Flesh Tutorials. Mixing Tutorials. FM8 Tutorials. Monark Tutorials. Spire Tutorials. Audiaire ZONE. Free Plug-ins. Moog Minitaur Tutorials. Studio Tours. To unlink all tracks in an instance of linked tracks, right-click on the link icon button to select all tracks in that instance and open the context menu, and then choose "Unlink Track s " from the context menu.

When unlinking tracks inside a Group Track, is it also possible to right-click on the Group Track header and choose "Unlink Track s " from the context menu. To link an additional track to an instance of linked tracks, first click on the link icon button, to select all tracks in that instance.

To remove one or more tracks from an instance of linked tracks, select the corresponding track header s and choose "Unlink Track s " from the context menu. Any subset of linked tracks, or a mix of linked and unlinked tracks, can be linked together by selecting their track headers and clicking the "Link Tracks" command in the context menu. The following controls and operations are synced on linked tracks: Track editing and time selection operations e.

When one or more track headers are selected, pressing "Shift" and clicking on a track's link icon will select all tracks from the originally selected track to the newly-clicked track, as well as all linked tracks belonging to the linked track's instance. Matching fades on linked tracks can be adjusted relative to their original values. Max for Live Improvements Updated the bundled Max build to version 8. The context menu of the controlled parameter now provides a "Go to Controlling Device" option.

A parameter that is controlled or automated by a Max for Live device will no longer incur a one-buffer delay in the signal sent by Max for Live, if the device containing the controlled parameter is positioned later than the Max for Live device in the device chain. The sample rate of a Sample loaded in Simpler. The slices of a Sample loaded in Simpler.

A Clip or Sample's warp markers. Adding or removing Macro Controls in a Rack. Macro randomization. Macro Control variations. The Live Set's Groove Pool. A Groove's properties. At the right side, "Root Note" and "Scale Name" choosers allow setting a root note and scale for the selected clip s. When a selected clip has Scale Mode enabled and a scale is selected, notes belonging to the scale are highlighted in the piano roll.

By default, key tracks belonging to the selected scale are highlighted in the MIDI Note Editor, and the root note is indicated by a prominent highlight in the piano roll. When editing multiple clips with different key and scale settings, any foreground clip with Scale Mode enabled now updates the global settings that are used to initialize the next created clips, as well as Push's key and scale.

When a selected clip has Scale Mode enabled and a scale is selected, pressing the new "Scale" "Fold to Scale" button at the right of the "Fold" button folds to key tracks containing notes, as well as key tracks belonging to the scale. It is now possible to set a preference for spelling a clip's notes with flats, sharps, or both, via the piano roll's context menu. An additional "Auto" option automatically selects flats or sharps based on the position of the root note in the circle of fifths.

The Chance Editor lane is hidden by default. The Velocity and Chance Editor lanes can be shown or hidden via the lane selector toggle buttons at the left. The Velocity and Chance Editor lanes can be resized individually via their split lines. If no markers are selected, values for all notes will be randomized. The slider's randomization value can be typed as a number with the keyboard, and triggers randomization when validated using the "Enter" key.

When a key track height is low enough, this triangle will disappear. It is possible to edit probabilities for selected notes in Draw Mode. Updated the appearance of Velocity markers. It is now possible to edit velocity values for selected notes using numerical keys. It is now possible to see and edit a velocity range, from which a velocity value is selected when a note is played.

In the Notes tab, a "Velocity Range" slider allows assigning velocity ranges to selected notes or all notes in a single clip, if none are selected. The velocity range is indicated by the shaded area between the horizontal handle and the velocity marker. Double-clicking the velocity marker will reset the range to 0. It is now possible to choose between two different Draw Mode options. When enabled, drawing MIDI notes is constrained to one single key track or pitch at a time, while holding the "ALT" key allows freehand melodic drawing.

When disabled, Draw Mode defaults to melodic drawing, and holding the "ALT" key enables pitch-locked drawing. The "Melodic" Draw Mode can be used to erase notes, when drawing starts on an existing note. When a MIDI controller that has MPE Mode enabled is selected as an input device on a track, the channel input routing is fixed to "All Channels" and no individual channels can be selected. This makes it possible to refine the expression of recorded material, or to automate polyphonic sound variations for MPE-capable instruments.

Each expression lane can be shown or hidden via the lane selector toggle buttons at the left. Each expression lane can be resized individually via their split lines. When clicking a note or any of its expression dimensions in the MIDI Note Editor while the Note Expression tab is open, the note will appear in a transparent overlay.

Breakpoints appear, allowing to edit the note's Pitch, Slide, and Pressure envelopes, while markers can be used to edit the note's Velocity and Release Velocity values. Unselected notes will appear grayed out, and their expression envelopes will be dimmed. It is possible to edit expression envelopes for multiple selected notes at once.

The expressions are scaled proportionally, similar to that of velocities for multiple selected notes. In the Note Expression tab, the grid is disabled by default for easier editing at a finer resolution. The grid's settings are separate from the grid in the other tabs, and they are saved with the clip.

All expression dimensions can be edited in Draw Mode. When a note is moved, its expression envelopes will move along with it. This also works for Pitch values in Draw Mode. This behaviour can be inverted using the same shortcuts when the grid is on. Pitch envelopes are hidden when Fold Mode is enabled in the Note Expression tab. The new "Focus" button enables Focus Mode, which allows editing the current foreground clip only.

Focus Mode can be toggled via the "N" keyboard shortcut. Holding "N" while editing with the mouse toggles Focus Mode momentarily. Loops are now visible and editable via mouse interactions. In Focus Mode, it is not possible to select more than one multi-clip loop bar at a time, and any existing multi-selection is ignored. When Focus Mode is disabled, It is possible to create a contiguous multi-selection of multi-clip loop bars by clicking them while holding the "Shift" modifier key.

When Focus Mode is enabled, any existing multi-selection is ignored. The loop bar region is vertically resizable. When Focus Mode is enabled while multi-clip editing, the loop length controls and Notes tools are now available for editing the active clip. Previously when crossing a loop boundary while making a rubberband selection, all notes were selected. Now, only the notes that are inside the selection rectangle are selected.

When Focus Mode is enabled, the title bar of the Clip box in the Detail View now appears in the active clip's color. When Focus Mode is disabled, "Scale" is enabled and will fold key tracks according to the scales of all clips in the selection that have Scale Mode enabled. When Focus mode is enabled, "Scale" is enabled and folds key tracks to the scale of the foreground clip, if the foreground clip has Scale Mode enabled.

It is now possible to transpose notes across multiple selected clips using the Transpose control in the Notes tab. The Invert button is now enabled in the Notes tab when at least one note is selected, and it is possible to invert selected notes from multiple clips at the same time.

The inversion is not applied on a per-clip basis, but for the selection as a whole - as if all selected notes belonged to one clip. The number of visible Macro Controls in Instrument Racks can now be controlled from a Max for Live device or a control surface. Per-note expression is forwarded through Racks.

Per-note expression is forwarded through these devices. The Arpeggiator device now supports modulating the root notes of an arpeggio via MPE. Note: MPE modulation is not applied to transpositions generated by the device.

Toggling MPE Mode in a plug-in device is now possible via the device's context menu. When MPE is enabled, an indicator appears on the device's title bar. Sampler: Sampler now supports MPE. Added an "MPE" text label to the right corner of the Sampler device's title bar. Simpler: Simpler now supports MPE. Added an "MPE" text label to the right corner of the Simpler device's title bar.

Wavetable can now be fully controlled using MPE controllers. All MPE modulation sources now appear in the device's expanded view. Added an "MPE" text label to the right corner of the Wavetable device's title bar. Collision: Updated the appearance of the Collision device's UI.

Corpus: Updated the appearance of the Corpus device's UI. Electric: Updated the appearance of the Electric device's UI. The "Tine" and "Tone Bar" parameters are now consistently named. Tension: Updated the appearance of the Tension device's UI. Chorus-Ensemble provides three different effect modes: Classic is a thickening chorus effect.

A high-pass filter allows removing the chorus signal from low frequencies. The width of the chorus signal can be adjusted; this is useful for complex mixing tasks. The feedback signal can be inverted, which results in a "hollow" sound when combined with high feedback values. Ensemble is based on and shares controls with the Classic mode, while adding a third phase-shifted delay line for a thicker chorus sound.

Vibrato applies stronger modulation than a chorus to create pitch variation. The shape of the modulation waveform can morph seamlessly from a sine to a triangle, and be used to create well-known "police siren" sounds. Global controls allow setting the modulation rate and amount, output gain, and harmonic saturation via the "Warmth" parameter.

Hybrid Reverb: Introduced "Hybrid Reverb", a new audio effect which allows blending a convolution reverb with a number of reverb algorithms. Besides providing a selection of impulse responses, the device allows dragging any audio file into the device to be used for the convolution processing, as well as shaping the envelope and size of impulse responses via dedicated controls. An algorithmic section contains several reverb modes, each providing a different set of parameters and sonic properties: Dark Hall, Prism, Quartz, Shimmer, and Tides.

The convolution and algorithmic sections can be routed either in series or parallel, and their volume relationship can be continuously adjusted via a Blend control. An EQ section can be used to shape the reverb sound, and a "Pre Algo" toggle allows excluding the convolution engine from the EQ. A "Vintage" control introduces a degradation of the signals, to emulate the behavior of older digital reverb units.

The MPE data is transformed via curves, which can consist of either two or three breakpoints. Phaser-Flanger combines the functionalities of the Phaser and Flanger devices into one, as separate effect modes. The Phaser mode has a new, lusher sound with increased frequency and modulation ranges, while the previous Earth and Space modes have been replaced with more expressive parameters.

Also included is a new Doubler effect mode. Redux: Upgraded the Redux device. New parameters allow creating a wider range of sounds, from harsh distortion to digital and aliasing artifacts, through to warm and fat 8-bit sounds. Jitter adds noise to the downsampling process. A Shape parameter allows transforming the quantizer's curve.

Based on spectral processing, Spectral Resonator uses spectral resonances and pitched overtones to add tonal character to any audio source. MIDI sidechain parameters allow processing any material in key with its surrounding musical elements. Spectral Resonator offers several spectral processing types on the input signal, including spectral filtering, spectral chorus, and granularization.

Spectral Time combines time freezing and spectral delay effects in a single inspiring device. The freeze and delay effects can be used together or independently, allowing for a wide range of possibilities, such as sustaining any sound infinitely, or combining delays with time-synced fade transitions. Additionally, when a Max for Live device is disabled, MPE will be forwarded through the device's dry signal path. The Expression Control device now allows assigning an additional parameter as a mapping target.

Pressing a new button in the upper right corner of the LED opens a new view, where each modulation target can be transformed via curves and breakpoints. New modulation sources have been added to the device: Expression Expression Controller, MIDI CC 11 Random allows generating a random modulation value per note Incremental allows adding a fixed amount to the modulation value with each new note Slide per-note Y-Axis, converted to monophonic modulation data; useful when controlling effects in a device chain via an MPE controller Sustain Sustain Pedal, MIDI CC 64 All Max for Live devices have been moved inside the application bundle previously, they lived in the Core Library , to ensure that using Collect All and Save will not create redundant copies of the devices.

Improved waveform drawing in the Shaper and Envelope Follower devices. Push Added a "Pressure" switch to Push 2's Setup Menu shown when pressing the Setup button that allows toggling between monophonic and polyphonic aftertouch when playing melodic instruments.

The state of this switch is stored in Live's preferences. Push 2 and MIDI controllers sending polyphonic aftertouch can be used with plug-in devices that support polyphonic aftertouch. When Push 2's Pressure mode is set to "Poly", the Repeat button now produces notes at full velocity when Accent is enabled. When a Rack contains a parameter mapped to one of the new Macro Controls i.

Degree symbol icons Push 1 or bullet point icons Push 2 are used to differentiate the Rack from the device. The new device is only visible when the Rack is open, but otherwise behaves exactly the same as the Rack. If Focus Mode is enabled in multi-clip editing, only the foreground clip's key and scale will be updated in Live. A mapped Macro Control can be excluded from randomization via the "Exclude Macro from Randomization" context menu option. Volume Macros in Instrument Rack presets are excluded from randomization by default.

By default, each stored variation will be named sequentially as "Variation 1", "Variation 2", etc. A variation can be renamed, duplicated or deleted via its context menu, the Edit menu, or using keyboard shortcuts. A variation can be launched in its stored state via the "Launch Macro Variation" button to the right, or overwritten via the "Overwrite Macro Variation" button to the left.

The maximum number of available Macro Controls in Live has been doubled to The state of the shown and hidden Macro Controls is saved in the Live Set. Added a context menu entry that excludes a Macro Control from changing when a different Macro Control variation is launched.

Unchecking the context menu entry will re-enable changes to that control as before, as the values are still stored in the variation. Scene numbers are now displayed in a new column in the Master track. Scene numbers are determined by their position. When a scene is moved, its number changes according to the scene's new position.

Selecting a scene or multiple scenes now opens the new Scene View, which allows editing the selected scene's tempo, time signature and Follow Actions.

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Surround Panner is a free Max for Live device that makes mixing for performances, installations and theaters using multi-channel speaker setups possible in Live.

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Watch: What is Live? Ableton Live lets you easily create, produce and perform music within one intuitive interface. Live keeps everything in sync and works in real-time, so you can play and modify your musical ideas without interrupting the creative flow. Live comes with a versatile collection of instruments, sounds, kits and loops for creating any kind of music and provides a full complement of effects to tweak and process your sound.

Unzip the file and run setup. Serum Presets. Sonic Academy. Maschine Kits. Mainroom Warehouse. Sonics Empire. Digit Sounds. Major Loops. Sonorous Sounds. Digital Felicity. Martin Sampleware. Sonus Dept. Dirty Production. Matte Noise. Soul Family Entertainment. Double Bang Music. Maverick Samples. Sound Design Tutorials. A-Grade Audio. Easy Sounds. Sound Masters. ADSR 20 Designers for Echo Sound Works. Mondo Loops. ADSR Sounds. Ecliptiq Audio. EDM Sound Productions. Akai Professional.

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